The Sustainable BBQ Brief

The first of 4, 3 week projects, to design a portable BBQ that uses an alternative energy source to bottled gas or charcoal. From speaking to lecturers and peers these briefs are fairly flexible, allowing me to change the overall definition of the project and see how it can be manipulated to create something more interesting.

So what already exists:

Figure 1 (Referenced Below)

As you can see, some of these design already use alternate energy sources, including electric for grill heating or electric of water bath heating. So I thought about what every one else thinks about at this point, and that’s solar. However, solar BBQ concepts, that include a portability option, already exist:

Figure 2 (Referenced Below)

These designs use the heat energy absorbed from the sun and reflect it from mirrored panels into a focused area. The large amount of energy reflected, heats up these areas to a high temperature to allow for cooking. From further research, these products all require lots of sunlight for a long duration, typically on a clear or lightly cloudy day. So what other fuel sources are there?

Picture13

Figure 3 (Referenced Below)

Biomass! Something that is formed from multiple sources as shown in figure. I could implement the use of these fuels into a new design. Of course I am aware that the best way to make the simplest BBQ is simply by starting a fire, using wood (a form of biomass), however what are the issues with using biomass fuels?

As it turns out 2.5 billion people around the world still use biomass as their main source of fuel for cooking. This accounts for 90% of household energy consumption. With these figures still set to increase to over 2.7 billion by 2030, that’s a third of the current population.

The major negative from this is that using biomass creates high levels of pollutants and nasty particulates that can cause life long or fatal incidents. The graph in figure 4 shows that the deaths from biomass fuel over weighed the deaths caused by Malaria. With figure 5 showing that India was the most hit by this with almost 500,000 people in a year.

Picture17

Figure 4 (Referenced Below)

Picture16

Figure 5 (Referenced Below)

From this I aim to research what is used in the developing countries and why these statistics are so high. I will have to consider the different cultures that a new product of system would be used in. This will help me to understand why they do what they do and to see if there is a simple way to improve the situation.

This has helped me to devise a new brief:

Due to amount of fatal incidents that occur using biomass, a portable cooking facility (or system) will be designed to remove these issues.

  • The design must contain a filtration system to remove any particulates made form burning biomass.
  • The design must be cheap to manufacture for easy distribution in developing countries.
  • The design must have an implement of portability.

More on this to follow!

References:

Figure 1:
Amazon.co.uk. (2018). Cite a Website – Cite This For Me. [online] Available at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/VonShef-Electric-Barbecue-Temperature-Thermometer/dp/B01B35M580 [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].
& Blue Digger. (n.d.). Folding Portable BBQ Grill with Carrier. [online] Available at: https://www.bluedigger.com/products/folding-portable-bbq-grill-w-carrier [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].
& eBay. (n.d.). Yellowstone Mini Folding Portable BBQ Barbeque Picnic Travel Camping Grill | eBay. [online] Available at: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Yellowstone-Mini-Folding-Portable-BBQ-Barbeque-Picnic-Travel-Camping-Grill-/272725106557 [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].
& Lazada.com.my. (n.d.). Electric Barbeque Grill. [online] Available at: https://www.lazada.com.my/electric-barbeque-grill-730700.html [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].
& Weber. (n.d.). Smokey Joe® Portable BBQ | Charcoal Range | Weber Australia. [online] Available at: https://www.weberbbq.com.au/barbecues/charcoal/portable/smokey-joe/ [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].

Figure 2:
Amazon.co.uk. (2018).  [online] Available at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/VonShef-Electric-Barbecue-Temperature-Thermometer/dp/B01B35M580 [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].
& GoSun. (n.d.). GoSun Grill®. [online] Available at: https://www.gosunstove.com/products/gosun-grill [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].
& Solar Cooking. (n.d.). Wilson Solar Grill. [online] Available at: http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Wilson_Solar_Grill [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].

Figure 3:
Zafar, S. (n.d.). Biomass Energy and Sustainability. [online] BioEnergy Consult. Available at: https://www.bioenergyconsult.com/biomass-energy-sustainability/ [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].

Figure 4:
ENERGY FOR COOKING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. (2006). [ebook] International Energy Agency. Available at: https://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/cooking.pdf [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].

Figure 5:
ENERGY FOR COOKING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. (2006). [ebook] International Energy Agency. Available at: https://www.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/cooking.pdf [Accessed 14 Feb. 2018].

 

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Published by

tomjfantom

BSc Product Designer at Cardiff Metropolitan University

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